Education Reform Continues To Go Round In Circles – But Is It Narrowing On A Point?

Should parents set up their own state schools? Discuss | Geraldine Bedell | Education | Education | The Observer.

In a long and winding story about the laborious battle for parents to take more control over their children’s education, one parent asserts that:

“Human beings were not meant just to get five GCSEs.”

While the author of the article interjects at one point with a relieving sentiment:

“Everyone wants local schools with a diverse mix of pupils who are able to explore and fulfill their potential.”

I should hope so.

Meanwhile in Ireland, this article shows there is some awareness of the need for educational reform, however, sound bytes such as “the need for a world-class education system” still plague this piece. At least in the sphere of education, world class, at the present time, does not entail a particularly high standard. There appears to be little public debate on the matter, a lot of Irish people who have little experience of their countries education system will still say things like “Sure don’t we have one of the best education systems in the world” based off placement on the PISA rankings from a few years ago. PISA is notorious for ranking nations based on standardized tests results where the standards vary from country to country,also leading to countries like India and China who slave drive their children into good grades and out of innovation, to top the rankings.

The article also notes that more reviews and reports from official bodies are in the pipeline, but at this rate an education that provides each individual with the means to grow, be happy, and fulfill their potential, is a pipe dream. The article calls for an honest discussion, perhaps we need a platform for this. Something to get teachers, educators, legislators, parents and students all in the same room and on equal footing.

One of the more encouraging resources I’ve found is this co-operative blog on education reform called ‘Cooperative Catalyst’. Its a hive of ideas and discussion, and the realization of what the article in the Irish Examiner was calling for – an open and honest conversation.

How do you guys think actual change can be implemented, or awareness of the issues effectively raised? What resources have you encountered? Please share!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s